love bytes

“… it’s hard to avoid noting that Texas — the very sovereign State of Texas, I should clarify, where the federal government is generally not welcome — was at a loss in dealing with a single Ebola case until the Feds stepped in.”

Ed Kilgore

"On Your Own" GOP rhetoric is worthless. The markets will not correct this problem. Free enterprise will let you die. The GOP "tax cuts solve everything" mentality will leave you with no options.

(via coginthemachine)

(Source: liberalsarecool, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

comedycentral:

Which of these #RuinADessert tweets takes the cake? Find out tonight on an all-new @midnight!

(via funnyordie)

“The history of human ideas about our place in the universe has been a long series of letdowns for everybody who likes to believe we’re special.”

Neil deGrasse Tyson

(via whats-out-there)

(via theuniverseatlarge)

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve spent my career in social work, finding jobs for people with disabilities. I love helping people, but I’m tired of being poor. So I’m looking for a job that’s a bit more commercial.""What was the most frustrating part of social work?""All the best people leave."

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve spent my career in social work, finding jobs for people with disabilities. I love helping people, but I’m tired of being poor. So I’m looking for a job that’s a bit more commercial."
"What was the most frustrating part of social work?"
"All the best people leave."

lifeandcode:

kateoplis:

Etsy’s Trying to Fix Tech’s Women Problem. Why Aren’t You?

The first step is, throw out the hoodie-wearing boy-genius and build a new archetype.

O HAI INSTITUTIONAL SEXISM, WE SURE DO END UP BUMPING INTO EACH OTHER A LOT, DON’T WE?  *sigh*

(via gender-and-science)

sourcedumal:

hobbitdragon:

crotchetybushtit:

usually unpopular opinion puffin pisses me off but this is so important

yes this

ALL OF THIS

sourcedumal:

hobbitdragon:

crotchetybushtit:

usually unpopular opinion puffin pisses me off but this is so important

yes this

ALL OF THIS

(Source: wildreservations, via trollfacemommy)

liberaleffects:

The Chicken-Hawks and/or Republicans Love the Cannon Fodder - Soldiers but Could Care Less About the Consequences/Responsibilities - Veterans.  

liberaleffects:

The Chicken-Hawks and/or Republicans Love the Cannon Fodder - Soldiers but Could Care Less About the Consequences/Responsibilities - Veterans.  

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

odinsblog:

ruckawriter:

worldoflis:

girldwarf:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

YAAAAEEESSSSSSS

You know what I like, and feel is so important? That he doesn’t say “Men thinks those are THEIR positions”. He says “We think those are OUR positions.”

As a male feminist, he still doesn’t exclude himself from the group of men.

Damn.

Well said.

We are (still) living in the age of the angry White male…who, unironically, is the beneficiary of 99.999% of society’s benefits 

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via cognitivedissonance)

aspiegirlspeaks:



(Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


You can’t tell that someone has autism by looking at them.  1 of 10
No one “looks” autistic. When a person is autistic, it just means their brain works differently. (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


Everybody’s brain works differently.  2 of 10
Everyone’s brain works a little differently. There are probably kids in your class who are really good at reading, but have to work harder in math. There’s probably a kid who is really good at art, but not so good at reading. Or a kid who is really good at every sport, but is afraid of public speaking. Everyone has things they’re good at, and things they have to work harder at. One way that brains can be different is that some people have an autism spectrum disorder. Just like every other kid, most kids with autism are good at some things but have to work harder at others. (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


Why are they doing that?  3 of 10
While you can’t tell that someone with autism has it just by looking at them, sometimes you’ll notice a kid that’s doing something different: spinning around for a long time, flapping their arms, jumping up and down a lot, or rocking back and forth. Those repetitive activities are called stims, and they’re doing it because it feels good, or it’s relaxing, or it’s fun, or as a way to block out too much noise around them. (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


Everybody’s ‘weird.’  4 of 10
Stimming can seem weird at first if you’re not used to it, but lots of people do things that are “weird.” People who don’t have autism or ADHD still do all kinds of little things when they’re “spacing out” or thinking hard, like biting their nails, chewing their pencils, tapping their feet, or humming to themselves. It’s just that we’re more used to seeing those things. Other “weird” things that lots of kids and adults do are talking to themselves, being picky about foods, only liking certain kinds of shirts, picking at scabs, or only liking one particular author. What are some “weird” things that you do? It’s okay that we’re all different. Think how boring it would be if we all did the same things all the time! (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


Lots of people talk with their hands.  5 of 10
Hand-flapping is pretty common in kids with autism. (But not every kid who flaps his or her hands is autistic, and not every kid with autism flaps.) Most of the time, hand-flapping just expresses excitement. How else do people use their hands to talk? We give the “thumbs up” and make peace signs. You raise your hand to let your teacher know you want to be called on. Deaf people might use American Sign Language. How else do you use your hands to express yourself? (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


Sometimes, kids with autism have trouble with facial expressions.  6 of 10
Sometimes, kids with autism won’t know how you’re feeling just by looking at your face. Also, sometimes their facial expressions won’t match how they’re actually feeling. Often, if your friend with autism doesn’t seem to have any expression on her face, it just means she’s still thinking about something. If you’re not sure how someone is feeling, ask them! (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


What are you a fan of?  7 of 10
Some people with autism, especially a kind of autism called Asperger Syndrome, are really interested in one particular thing. Really, really interested. Their favorite topic could be anything: a certain video game, LEGOs, a kind of animal, weather patterns, ancient Egypt. But there are also a lot of kids and adults who don’t have autism who are really into something. Everyone knows someone who seems “obsessed” with their favorite sports team, for example. You don’t have to be autistic to be really into Harry Potter, Star Wars, or a favorite sports team. Sometimes kids with autism will forget to talk about other things besides their favorite topic. It’s okay to say, “can we talk about something else now?” (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


Explain the rules!  8 of 10
Kids with autism want to play, too! Sometimes, it’s harder for them to ask if they can play with you, and they might not understand which people are playing what, and how to get in the game. Besides asking your friend if he wants to play, it can be helpful if you explain what the rules of the game are. (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


Lots of adults have autism, too.  9 of 10
Autism isn’t just a kid thing. Lots of grown-ups have autism. Often, autism “runs” in families just like hair color, eye color, or other differences like ADHD. Just like kids with autism, some adults with autism need lots of help, and some don’t. (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)


Individuals with autism are individuals.  10 of 10
Just like all the kids in your class are a little different, all people with autism are different.  If you met a kid with red hair who really likes Transformers, you wouldn’t expect every person with red hair to really like Transformers. It’s the same thing with autism. Not every autistic person likes the same stuff, is good at the same things, or has a hard time with the same things. They’re individuals just like you’re an individual.

aspiegirlspeaks:


  • (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • You can’t tell that someone has autism by looking at them. 1 of 10
    You can't tell that someone has autism by looking at them.
    No one “looks” autistic. When a person is autistic, it just means their brain works differently.

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • Everybody’s brain works differently. 2 of 10
    Everybody's brain works differently.
    Everyone’s brain works a little differently. There are probably kids in your class who are really good at reading, but have to work harder in math. There’s probably a kid who is really good at art, but not so good at reading. Or a kid who is really good at every sport, but is afraid of public speaking. Everyone has things they’re good at, and things they have to work harder at. One way that brains can be different is that some people have an autism spectrum disorder. Just like every other kid, most kids with autism are good at some things but have to work harder at others.

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • Why are they doing that? 3 of 10
    Why are they doing that?
    While you can’t tell that someone with autism has it just by looking at them, sometimes you’ll notice a kid that’s doing something different: spinning around for a long time, flapping their arms, jumping up and down a lot, or rocking back and forth. Those repetitive activities are called stims, and they’re doing it because it feels good, or it’s relaxing, or it’s fun, or as a way to block out too much noise around them.

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • Everybody’s ‘weird.’ 4 of 10
    Everybody's 'weird.'
    Stimming can seem weird at first if you’re not used to it, but lots of people do things that are “weird.” People who don’t have autism or ADHD still do all kinds of little things when they’re “spacing out” or thinking hard, like biting their nails, chewing their pencils, tapping their feet, or humming to themselves. It’s just that we’re more used to seeing those things. Other “weird” things that lots of kids and adults do are talking to themselves, being picky about foods, only liking certain kinds of shirts, picking at scabs, or only liking one particular author. What are some “weird” things that you do? It’s okay that we’re all different. Think how boring it would be if we all did the same things all the time!

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • Lots of people talk with their hands. 5 of 10
    Lots of people talk with their hands.
    Hand-flapping is pretty common in kids with autism. (But not every kid who flaps his or her hands is autistic, and not every kid with autism flaps.) Most of the time, hand-flapping just expresses excitement. How else do people use their hands to talk? We give the “thumbs up” and make peace signs. You raise your hand to let your teacher know you want to be called on. Deaf people might use American Sign Language. How else do you use your hands to express yourself?

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • Sometimes, kids with autism have trouble with facial expressions. 6 of 10
    Sometimes, kids with autism have trouble with facial expressions.
    Sometimes, kids with autism won’t know how you’re feeling just by looking at your face. Also, sometimes their facial expressions won’t match how they’re actually feeling. Often, if your friend with autism doesn’t seem to have any expression on her face, it just means she’s still thinking about something. If you’re not sure how someone is feeling, ask them!

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • What are you a fan of? 7 of 10
    What are you a fan of?
    Some people with autism, especially a kind of autism called Asperger Syndrome, are really interested in one particular thing. Really, really interested. Their favorite topic could be anything: a certain video game, LEGOs, a kind of animal, weather patterns, ancient Egypt. But there are also a lot of kids and adults who don’t have autism who are really into something.

    Everyone knows someone who seems “obsessed” with their favorite sports team, for example. You don’t have to be autistic to be really into Harry Potter, Star Wars, or a favorite sports team. Sometimes kids with autism will forget to talk about other things besides their favorite topic. It’s okay to say, “can we talk about something else now?”

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • Explain the rules! 8 of 10
    Explain the rules!
    Kids with autism want to play, too! Sometimes, it’s harder for them to ask if they can play with you, and they might not understand which people are playing what, and how to get in the game. Besides asking your friend if he wants to play, it can be helpful if you explain what the rules of the game are.

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • Lots of adults have autism, too. 9 of 10
    Lots of adults have autism, too.
    Autism isn’t just a kid thing. Lots of grown-ups have autism. Often, autism “runs” in families just like hair color, eye color, or other differences like ADHD. Just like kids with autism, some adults with autism need lots of help, and some don’t.

    (Photo Credit: iStockphoto)
  • Individuals with autism are individuals. 10 of 10
    Individuals with autism are individuals.
    Just like all the kids in your class are a little different, all people with autism are different.

    If you met a kid with red hair who really likes Transformers, you wouldn’t expect every person with red hair to really like Transformers. It’s the same thing with autism. Not every autistic person likes the same stuff, is good at the same things, or has a hard time with the same things. They’re individuals just like you’re an individual.